TCOOL TECHNOLOGY
KEEPS TURF 50 DEGREES COOLER

Cools Turf UP TO 50°F

Keeping synthetic turf systems cool and comfortable during warm summer months is the number one industry question. Introducing T°Cool Evaporative Cooling Technology that keeps the turf temperature down up to 50°F.

Molecular Structure

The thermoplastic, or PE, the primary material used to manufacture the turf, absorbs and retains heat differently than natural grass. The thermal buildup is not safety but rather a comfort issue. When solar energy is transmitted to the turf surface, it transfers excess heat to the air within a safe area (below the chest level.) The conventional solutions are centered around infills. But as a practice has shown, many of them won't work as anticipated.

HYDROGEN

CARBON

LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE (LDPE)

Molecular Structure

Testing
TºCool System

The answer to cooling synthetic turf lies in the physics of heat energy. Heat can be transferred from one object to another in four ways: conduction, convection, advection, and radiation. The Sun's emits heat in the form…

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Heat
Conduction

Heat conduction is the flow of internal energy from a region of higher temperature to an area with of a lower temperature. Above -273.15° Celsius, every object's particles (atoms, ions, electrons, molecules, etc.)…

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EVAPORATIVE
COOLING

Evaporative cooling is something that we have all know and experienced. Wearing a damp tee shirt on a warm but windy day gives us a chill. The phenomenon that causes this is the latent heat of vaporization.

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LATENT
HEAT

Latent heat is the heat energy per mass unit required for a phase change to occur. To cause a state change in the water, or to break intermolecular forces which hold the molecules of water together...

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THE STATES OF WATER

Water exists in three states: as solid (ice), liquid, or gas (vapor.) Snow, rain, and clouds are all made of some state of water.

In a solid state (ice), water molecules are all hydrogen-bonded. Hydrogen bonds hold the water molecules in place. A regular crystalline structure consists of a single oxygen atom covalently bonded to two hydrogen atoms: H-O-H. When water freezes, its molecules move apart, begin moving around slower, allowing them to form hydrogen bonds, and eventually become an open crystalline structure. Since this structure is open, the volume decreases by about 9%, making ice lighter than the same volume of water. Water is one of the few substances whose solid state can float on its liquid state.

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF ICE

In a liquid state, water molecules move around quicker than in its solid state, enabling them to form fewer hydrogen bonds and stay close together. Each particle forms hydrogen bonds between the positive side of hydrogen atoms of one water molecule and negative side of neighboring water molecule.

In ice, hydrogen bonds hold the water molecules in place. A regular crystalline structure consists of a single oxygen atom covalently bonded to two hydrogen atoms: H-O-H.

MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF WATER

Hydrogen form a bond. The lack of hydrogen bonds explains why steam burns more than water at the same temperature. Vapor contains all energy used to break hydrogen bonds in water. When it hits your skin, it suddenly loses energy causing damage to your cells.

Hydrogen bonds between the positive side of hydrogen atoms of one water molecule and negative side of neigboring water molecule.

RANDOM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF VAPORIZED WATER

Current research suggests that the energy required to free an atom from the liquid is equivalent to the energy needed to overcome the surface resistance of the fluid. Since water has relatively high surface tension from its hydrogen bonds, thus water needs to absorb a significant amount of energy to go through a state change. The amount of heat transfer depends on the evaporation rate, which in turn depends on the air humidity and its temperature. When the air is very humid, the evaporation is slower. Thus, it's more effective in dry climates.

In gases, the molecules are not connected to each other and can move around freely.

LET'S COMPARE

REGULAR INFILL

Most common infill materials trap solar rays and heat the surface to 150 to 180 degrees.

T°Cool has slow release evaporative cooling. Absorbs heat energy and drastically reduces the surface temperature.

Most common infill materials trap solar rays and heat the surface to 150 - 180 degrees.

The T°Cool eco-friendly, healthy and cost-effective infill solution cools down synthetic turf by an applied principle of evaporative cooling. Testing has shown that the T°Cool systems reduce the surface by 30 to 50°F.

T°Cool also adds the benefit of the antimicrobial addictive, BacShield. The antimicrobial protection is not just about the cleanliness of the surface. The hundreds of volatile compounds of bacterial cultures produce a lot of smells, and mostly not ones we like. The BacShield fights harmful microorganisms including bacteria, protozoans, viruses, and fungi such as mold and mildew. When microbes come into contact with the turf surface, the antimicrobial agents penetrate its cell walls and disrupt key cell functions to limit microbial growth and reproduction.

BACSHIELD ANTIMICROBIAL
PROTECTIVE SOLUTION

When applied to a surface, T°Cool creates an antimicobial coating that inhibits odor and mildew.

MICROBE

DEAD
MICROBE

ANTIMICROBIAL PROTECTIVE SOLUTION

With T°Cool, the time when synthetic turf needed a warning sign
about blistering temperatures is over.

While artificial grass, impervious to drought conditions, is more susceptible to high temperatures than its counterpart, T°Cool allows for safer and more comfirtable playing surface conditions for athletes and children.

SUN/RADIATION

safety area

transfer of excess heat

SYNTHETIC TURF SURFACE